ELECTRICAL STIMULATION WITH AN ELECTRODE TO TREAT NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

ELECTRICAL STIMULATION WITH AN ELECTRODE TO TREAT NEUROLOGICAL DISORDERS

Many diseases as well as brain disorders will be treated with electrical stimulation using an electrode constituted within the brain. However, the electrodes will turn out scarring, that diminishes their effectiveness and may necessitate further surgeries to interchange them. MIT researchers have currently incontestable that manufacturing these electrodes abundant smaller will primarily eliminate this scarring, probably permitting the devices to stay within the brain for much longer

“What the researchers doing is altering the dimensions and creating the procedure less invasive,” says archangel Cima, a member of MIT’s Robert Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer. Researchers were designing brain implants that records brain activity or deliver medicine to terribly targeted locations.

Many brain disease patients have benefited from treatment with low-frequency electrical current delivered to a locality of the brain concerned in movement management. The electrodes used for this deep brain stimulation is a couple of millimeters in diameter. Once being constituted, they bit by bit generate connective tissue through the constant rubbing of the conductor against the encircling brain tissue. This method, referred to as “Gliosis”, contributes to the high failure rate of such devices.

Previous studies have urged that making the implants smaller or softer might cut back the quantity of scarring, therefore the university team kicked off to reduce the consequences of each by decreasing the dimensions of the implants and coating them with a soft synthetic resin glycol (PEG) gel.

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